literature, writing

What Does Publishing Mean by “High Concept,” Really?

If you've done much research on getting your writing published, chances are you’ve come across the term “high concept.” Agents and editors sometimes use the phrase "high-concept fiction" when taking about the sort of writing they'd like to acquire, and you'll often hear it touted by writing blogs as a surefire way to make your… Continue reading What Does Publishing Mean by “High Concept,” Really?

history, travel

A Visit to Keldur, Iceland

Anyone familiar with Iceland has likely heard something about turf houses, the iconic grass-roofed houses that grace the countryside, carried over from insulation methods in medieval Norway. I wrote once before about Rútshellir, a famous old cave guarded by a turf-covered barn. But while the cave itself might be the oldest man-made residence in Iceland,… Continue reading A Visit to Keldur, Iceland

linguistics, literature

Dialects in Literature: A Look at Robert Burns

It's a song commonly played to ring in the New Year, bidding farewell to the old. Across the English-speaking world, it's used for graduations, for funerals, for any major transitional period in one's life. As a result, pretty much everyone is familiar with the tune. But growing up, I never knew anyone who was actually… Continue reading Dialects in Literature: A Look at Robert Burns

linguistics, literature

The Common Soldier: An Archetype in 17th- and 18th-Century Theatre

In a world of emerging paper currency and capitalism, it comes as little surprise that contemporary entertainment so often focused on economic problems. A surprisingly common theme in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century works was the economics of the human body. Often, this issue was addressed in literature and performances through female prostitution, but some texts present… Continue reading The Common Soldier: An Archetype in 17th- and 18th-Century Theatre